Florida Delivery Man Hit By Police Car, Arrested

MIAMI (AP) — A Miami sandwich shop bicycle delivery man was struck by an unmarked police car — and then jailed for 12 hours.

The Miami Herald reports that 19-year-old Jimmy John’s delivery man Mason Morales was on his bicycle and in a crosswalk when Miami police officer Kenia Fallat struck his bike Thursday and knocked him to the pavement.

Morales responded by throwing his bike at the car, denting the passenger door. Morales told the newspaper that Fallat had been on her phone. He says he knew he was in trouble when Fallat got out of the car and he saw her uniform.

“The whole thing was pretty awful and stupid,” Morales said. “I don’t think I should have been brought in for that.”

Morales was handcuffed, charged with criminal mischief and taken to jail until his mother bailed him out at 3 a.m. Friday. Morales said he was also ticketed for failing to yield the right of way.

Fallat and Miami Police declined comment. The damage to the car was estimated at $500.

Morales said incidents with cars are fairly common while delivering food in Miami.

“I deal with this every day — drivers who don’t pay attention to where they’re going,” Morales told the newspaper. “I’ve been hit before. I broke my nose once.”

Lil Wayne Hospitalized After Suffering Seizure (Report)

Rapper Lil Wayne has reportedly been hospitalized in Chicago after suffering an epileptic seizure. According to TMZ, Wayne (real name: Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr.) was found unconscious in his Westin Hotel room on Sunday afternoon (Sept. 3). He was taken to Northwestern Hospital where he experienced another seizure. The New Orleans rapper has long suffered from… Read more »

Venice Facetime: Japanese Director Hirokazu Kore-eda

Twenty-two years after his debut feature, “Maboroshi no Hikari,” screened in competition, Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda returns to the Venice Film Festival with his first-ever mystery thriller, “The Third Murder.” The film, which opens in Japan on Sept. 9, stars Masaharu Fukuyama, who also headlined Kore-eda’s 2013 family drama “Like Father, Like Son,” as an... Read more »

Trump Expected To End ‘Dreamers’ Program

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is expected to announce that he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, but with a six-month delay, people familiar with the plans said Sunday.

The delay in the formal dismantling of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program would be intended to give Congress time to decide whether it wants to address the status of the so-called Dreamers in legislation, according to two people familiar with the president’s thinking. But it was not immediately clear how the six-month delay would work in practice and what would happen to people who currently have work permits under the program, or whose permits expire during the six-month stretch.

It also was unclear exactly what would happen if Congress failed to pass a measure by the considered deadline. Two people familiar with the president’s thinking spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter ahead of a planned Tuesday announcement.

The president, who has been grappling with the issue for months, has been known to change his mind in the past and could still shift course.

Trump has been wrestling for months with what to do with the Obama-era DACA program, which has given nearly 800,000 young immigrants a reprieve from deportation and the ability to work legally in the form of two-year, renewable work permits.

The expected move would come as the White House faces a Tuesday deadline set by Republican state officials threatening to continue sue the Trump administration if the president did not end the program. It also would come as Trump digs in on appeals to his base as he finds himself increasingly under fire, with his poll numbers hanging at near-record lows.

Trump had been personally torn as late as last week over how to deal with what are undoubtedly the most sympathetic immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. Many came to the U.S. as young children and have no memories of or connections to the countries they were born in.

During his campaign, Trump slammed DACA as illegal “amnesty” and vowed to eliminate the program the day he took office. But since his election,

Trump has wavered on the issue, at one point telling The Associated Press that those covered could “rest easy.”

Trump had been unusually candid as he wrestled with the decision in the early months of his administration. During a February press conference, he said the topic was “a very, very difficult subject for me, I will tell you. To me, it’s one of the most difficulty subjects I have.”

“You have some absolutely incredible kids — I would say mostly,” he said. adding: “I love these kids.”

All the while, his administration continued to process applications and renew DACA work permits, to the dismay of immigration hard-liners.

News of the president’s expected decision appeared to anger advocates on both sides of the issue.

“If reports are true, Pres Trump better prepare for the civil rights fight of his admin. A clean DREAM Act is now a Nat Emergency #DefendDACA,” tweeted New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, a Democrat.

But Rep. Steve King, an Iowa Republican who has called DACA unconstitutional, warned that a delay in dismantling it would amount to “Republican suicide.”

“Ending DACA now gives chance 2 restore Rule of Law. Delaying so R Leadership can push Amnesty is Republican suicide,” he wrote.

It would be up to congressional lawmakers to pass a measure to protect those who have been covered under the program. While there is considerable support for that prospect among Democrats and moderate Republicans, Congress is already facing a packed fall agenda and has had a poor track record in recent years in passing immigration-related bills.

House Speaker Paul Ryan and a number of other legislators urged Trump last week to hold off on scrapping DACA to give them time to come up with a legislative fix.

“These are kids who know no other country, who are brought here by their parents and don’t know another home. And so I really do believe that there needs to be a legislative solution,” Ryan told Wisconsin radio station WCLO.

The Obama administration created the DACA program in 2012 as a stopgap to protect some young immigrants from deportation as they pushed unsuccessfully for a broader immigration overhaul in Congress.

The program protected people in the country illegally who could prove they arrived before they were 16, had been in the United States for several years and had not committed a crime while being here. It mimicked versions of the so-called DREAM Act, which would have provided legal status for young immigrants but was never passed by Congress.

As of July 31, 2015, more than 790,000 young immigrants had been approved under the program, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

SacAnime Takes Over the Convention Center

It’s annual tradition that continues to get bigger and bigger every year. We are talking about Sacramento Anime.

Thousands of people dressed in all kinds of creative costumes from the world of Japanese anime and videos games are at the event going right now at the Sacramento Convention Center.

The fanfare centers around the world of science fiction and video games – giving fans a chance to dress up and act out their favorite characters.

It’s also a rare chance to meet some of the casts who give their voice to the various video games and cartoons.

In the past, this event was held in smaller venues or just using half of the convention center.

The event has gotten so popular that they’ve have taken over the entire convention center.

South Korea Simulates Attack On North’s Nuke Site After Test

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Following U.S. warnings to North Korea of a “massive military response,” South Korea’s military on Monday fired missiles into the sea to simulate an attack on the North’s main nuclear test site a day after Pyongyang detonated its largest ever nuclear test explosion.

The heated words from the United States and the military maneuvers in South Korea are becoming familiar responses to North Korea’s rapid, as-yet unchecked pursuit of a viable arsenal of nuclear-tipped missiles that can strike the United States. The most recent, and perhaps most dramatic, advancement came Sunday in an underground test of what leader Kim Jong Un’s government claimed was a hydrogen bomb, the North’s sixth nuclear test since 2006.

In a series of tweets, President Donald Trump threatened to halt all trade with countries doing business with the North, a veiled warning to China, and faulted South Korea for what he called “talk of appeasement.”

South Korea’s military said its live-fire exercise was meant to “strongly warn” Pyongyang. The drill involved F-15 fighter jets and the country’s land-based “Hyunmoo” ballistic missiles firing into the Sea of Japan.

The target was set considering the distance to the North’s test site and the exercise was aimed at practicing precision strikes and cutting off reinforcements, Seoul’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said.

Each new North Korean missile and nuclear test gives Pyongyang’s scientists invaluable information that allows big jumps in capability. North Korea is thought to have a growing arsenal of nuclear bombs and has spent decades trying to perfect a multistage, long-range missile to eventually carry smaller versions of those bombs.

Both diplomacy and severe sanctions have failed to check the North’s decades-long march to nuclear mastery.

In Washington, Trump, asked by a reporter if he would attack the North, said: “We’ll see.” No U.S. military action appeared imminent, and the immediate focus appeared to be on ratcheting up economic penalties, which have had little effect thus far.

In briefs remarks after a White House meeting with Trump and other national security officials, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters that America does not seek the “total annihilation” of the North, but then added somberly, “We have many options to do so.”

Mattis said the U.S. will answer any threat from the North with a “massive military response — a response both effective and overwhelming.”

Mattis also said the international community is unified in demanding the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and that Kim should know Washington’s commitment to Japan and South Korea is unshakeable.

The precise strength of the North’s underground nuclear explosion has yet to be determined. South Korea’s weather agency said the artificial earthquake caused by the explosion was five times to six times stronger than tremors generated by the North’s previous five tests.

Sunday’s detonation builds on recent North Korean advances that include test launches in July of two ICBMs. The North says its missile development is part of a defensive effort to build a viable nuclear deterrent that can target U.S. cities.

North Korea has made a stunning jump in progress for its nuclear and missile program since Kim rose to power following his father’s death in late 2011. The North followed its two tests of Hwasong-14 ICBMs, which, when perfected, could target large parts of the United States, by threatening to launch a salvo of its Hwasong-12 intermediate range missiles toward the U.S. Pacific island territory of Guam in August.

It flew a Hwasong-12 over northern Japan last week, the first such overflight by a missile capable of carrying nukes, in a launch Kim described as a “meaningful prelude” to containing Guam, the home of major U.S. military facilities, and vowed to launch more ballistic missile tests targeting the Pacific.

Ahead of the North’s test, photos released by the North Korean government showed Kim talking with his lieutenants as he observed a silver, peanut-shaped device that was apparently the purported thermonuclear weapon destined for an ICBM. The images were taken without outside journalists present and could not be independently verified. What appeared to be the nose cone of a missile could also be seen in one photo, and another showed a diagram on the wall behind Kim of a bomb mounted inside a cone.

The Arms Control Association in the United States said the explosion appeared to produce a yield in excess of 100 kilotons of TNT equivalent, which it said strongly suggests the North tested a high-yield but compact nuclear weapon that could be launched on a missile of intermediate or intercontinental range.

Beyond the science of the blast, North Korea’s accelerating push to field a nuclear weapon that can target all of the United States is creating political complications for the U.S. as it seeks to balance resolve with reassurance to allies that Washington will uphold its decades-long commitment to deter nuclear attack on South Korea and Japan.

That is why some questioned Trump’s jab at South Korea. He tweeted that Seoul is finding that its “talk of appeasement” will not work. The North Koreans, he added, “only understand one thing,” implying military force might be required. The U.S. has about 28,000 troops stationed in South Korea and is obliged by treaty to defend it in the event of war.

Trump also suggested putting more pressure on China, the North’s patron for many decades and a vital U.S. trading partner, in hopes of persuading Beijing to exert more effective leverage on its neighbor. Trump tweeted that the U.S. is considering “stopping all trade with any country doing business with North Korea.” Such a halt would be radical. The U.S. imports about $40 billion in goods a month from China, North Korea’s main commercial partner.

Experts have questioned whether the North has gone too far down the nuclear road to continue pushing for a denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, an Obama administration policy goal still embraced by Trump’s White House.

“Denuclearization is not a viable U.S. policy goal,” said Richard Fontaine, president of the Center for a New American Security, but neither should the U.S. accept North Korea as a nuclear power. “We should keep denuclearization as a long-term aspiration, but recognize privately that it’s unachievable anytime soon.”

Police investigate a fatal crash in southeast Albuquerque

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE)– Police are investigating a potentially fatal crash in southeast Albuquerque.

It happened at the intersection of Gibson and Quincy Sunday evening.

Police say that the driver of the involved vehicle possibly suffered from a medical episode, causing her to cross the median, travel across all traffic lanes and strike a tree.

The woman was pronounced dead on scene.

No other drivers were injured.

The crash is still under investigation.

 


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Police investigate after man shot in Southwest Albuquerque

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – Police are investigating after a19-year-old was shot in the Westgate area.

APD says it happened in the 9500 block of Treasure Stone SW Sunday evening. That’s near 98th and Tower.

Police say the victim, who is also being called the offender, is not cooperating with police. APD says witnesses and family are also being uncooperative in the investigation.

Further information, like what lead up to the shooting, is limited at this time.

KRQE News 13 will provide updates as more details are provided.


Filed under: Albuquerque - Metro, Crime, Home, News