R. Kelly’s Brother: ‘I Just Know He Has A Problem With Control’

CHICAGO (CBS) — Carey Kelly, singer R. Kelly’s younger brother, says he has nothing to gain by lying, and he does not regret taking part in the docuseries “Surviving R. Kelly.”

“I’m still surviving R. Kelly,” he said. “Because I got to look over my shoulders.”

carey kelly R. Kellys Brother: I Just Know He Has A Problem With Control

Carey grew up with R. Kelly in Chicago, and he’s speaking out now.

“To see all these other women come forth and hear the allegations and different things, I felt bad that I didn’t speak earlier than what I did,” he said.

Carey says he hasn’t talked to his brother, whom he still calls Robert, since the singer’s acquittal on child pornography charges a decade ago, charges that centered on a sex tape R. Kelly allegedly made with an underage girl. At the time, there was talk Carey was actually the man on the tape.

“I was not the man in that video,” Carey said.

After the case ended, Carey says the two spoke by phone.

“Once he beat that case, I called him. And I said, ‘Hey man, you know, God gave you another chance, you know. God gave you another chance.’ And his arrogance, and people not believing different things that he’s accused of said, ‘God didn’t give me another chance. I gave me another chance. My money gave me another chance.’”

That was their last conversation. Since then, more than a dozen women have accused R. Kelly of mistreating and abusing them, sometimes when they were underage, and sometimes in the singer’s West Town studio.

When asked if there was any truth to the allegations, Carey said, “He married Aliyah. I don’t get no truer than that.”

Aliyah was 15 at the time. The marriage was later annulled.

When asked if R. Kelly is a pedophile, Carey Kelly said, “I mean, I can’t say that for sure. I just know that he has a problem with control. I love my brother, but he do have a problem. And if anybody out there love him, they should want to see him get help.”

Carey Kelly says he noticed troubling behavior decades ago when his brother would ask him to “get girls for him at concerts.”

“I mean, to me they looked underage,” Carey said.

Carey says there’s fallout from him speaking out. It’s divided his family, leading some members to make what he calls false allegations of sexual molestation against him. He says his 12-year-old daughter was bullied then unfairly suspended for making threats against her school even though a friend confessed he’d made it up. District 148 officials declined comment.

“You have the people over here on this side is speaking the truth, and they’re not with that. They don’t condone it. Then you have people on this side feeling like, well if I ever say anything bad about Robert, he might not give me anything. He might cut me off,” Carey said.

Carey says he was repeatedly molested by a family member as a child and believes his brother may have been as well.

CBS 2 reached out to R. Kelly’s attorney for comment but did not hear back.

 

CA Wildfire Burn Zones Prepare For Possible Mudslides

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Sonoma County officials are warning residents about the possibility of mudslides Wednesday night into Thursday in the areas burned by the Oct. 2017 North Bay wildfires.

Likewise, Butte County officials prepared for mudslides and flooding in the area burned by the devastating Camp Fire.

Because of wet weather passing throughout California, residents in and around the burn scar areas should be prepared for mudslides that could result in slippage.

Additionally, residents should be prepared for possible localized flooding, traffic impacts and high wind-related problems like falling trees and power outages.

Residents are advised to keep emergency kits nearby and to avoid driving through floodwaters.

The Camp Fire, which sparked in November 2018, was the deadliest wildfire in California history. The blaze killed 86 people, burned 153,336 acres and destroyed 13,972 residences and 4,821 buildings.

RELATEDCalifornia’s Camp Fire ‘The World’s Costliest Natural Disaster Of 2018’

On Oct. 8, 2017, the Tubbs Fire began in Calistoga and spread to the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa, destroying thousands of structures.

That same day, the Nuns Fire was reported in Sonoma and Napa counties and the Atlas Fire was reported in Napa and Solano Counties.

The Tubbs Fire burned 36,807 acres, the Nuns Fire burned 56,556 acres and the Atlas Fire burned 51,624 acres. The fires killed a total of 44 people.

© Copyright 2019 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Bay City News Service contributed to this report.

 

‘Closer To Striking Than Striking A Deal’: Teachers & DPS Continue Negotiations

DENVER (CBS4) – Negotiations between Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association were on hold Wednesday. Both sides expressed concern about how to come to an agreement just days before the union is set to vote on a strike.

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Troy Valentine (credit: CBS)

“It’s been really tough. It’s been really stressful,” said Troy Valentine, a civics and government teacher at Denver School of Innovation and Sustainable Design.

Valentine is in his first year teaching at that school, but has worked for five years in the district. He has attended many bargaining sessions for more than a year leading up to the negotiations taking place this week. He admits the profession he and others chose is not one that will ever pay as well as other jobs even though their experience and education may be comparable.

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(credit: CBS)

But he says the union is asking for teachers like him to get a competitive wage based on other districts and to manage expenses in a major city.

“It’s always tough to teach,” he said. “This isn’t an easy job, and I didn’t get into this job because I thought it was going to be easy.”

His wife is also a teacher in the district, and they have a 3-year-old son. Valentine also shared he has $83,000 in student loans he still needs to pay off. He says, in other districts, he could make between 13,000-14,000 a year more for the same position.

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“It’s difficult to find that motivation when I know the possibility of a strike is in a week,” he said. “A strike is a sacrifice and sacrifice is to pressure the district to pay us a fair wage.”

Denver Public Schools has released multiple responses to negotiations online to share with the public its view of how the process is playing out with the union. Administrators say the proposal they have put on the table includes one of the highest starting rates for teachers in the metro area, and the average teacher seeing an increase in pay around 10 percent.

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They also highlight a pathway to $100,000 for certain teachers based on experience and education. To achieve these changes, the district says it is making cuts at the administrative level and using $7 million from the central office to put into its compensation package.

“To help fund this proposal, we are making significant cuts to our Central Office,” Susana Cordova said in a video posted online by the district. “We feel like we’ve made significant movement toward that middle ground and we’re anxious to continue the work together.”

Valentine says he is frustrated by the number of executives the district has employed. He thinks more concessions need to be made at the administrative level to bring up the pay of teachers. The amount quoted by the district, he believes should be more than doubled to a total of $20 million.

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(credit: CBS)

“If a strike happened, that means there’s no income coming to our household,” he said. “I do not have the money to pay my bills as it stands so if I miss a day of pay, I miss a week of pay, it impacts my family greatly.”

The cost of the strike would force him to go straight from the picket line to his car so he could work for ride sharing services. It would be the only income while he and his wife are on strike and to cover major expenses like daycare for his son.

Both sides will meet again on Thursday and Friday. The union has scheduled a vote for Saturday, but would wait until after the holiday weekend on Tuesday to complete the process. A strike would not begin until the end of the month.

“Teachers are worried, administrators are worried,” he said. “We’re far closer to striking than striking a deal.”

LINKS: Denver Classroom Teachers Association | Denver Public Schools Negotiation Updates

Oakland Teachers Plan Unsanctioned Disruption To Protest Slow Contract Talks

OAKLAND (CBS SF) — A group of Oakland teachers said Wednesday that they plan to engage in a major disruption on Friday to protest the slow pace of contract talks between the Oakland Unified School District and the teachers’ union.

The action on Friday is largely being organized by a group of Oakland High School teachers called the Wildcat Underground that coordinated a sickout by dozens of teachers on Dec. 10.

Protest organizers said teachers and students from Oakland High School, Oakland Technical High School, Life Academy, Skyline, United for Success Academy, and Fremont High School plan to gather at Oakland Tech at 4531 Broadway at 8 a.m. on Friday for a rally outside the school.

They said that at 9 a.m. teachers and students will start marching to school district offices at 1000 Broadway, which is two-and-a-half miles away, and at 10 a.m., teachers, student, and allies will gather outside the school offices.

“We hope to disrupt district business as usual, ” Oakland High School history teacher Cole Margen said in a statement.

Margen said, “We need our district to understand that we are on the brink of a catastrophic strike. This will impact Oakland’s educational system, both teachers and students.”

He said, “The issues we face are similar to those in Los Angeles,” where teachers went on strike on Monday.

Margen said Friday’s action isn’t sanctioned by the Oakland Education Association, the union that represents teachers.

The OEA said last week that it is strongly considering conducting a strike authorization vote by the end of the month.

The teachers organizing the action on Friday noted that a strike by Oakland teachers lasted for more than two months. Contract talks between the school district and the union have been going on for about a year and a half.

The two sides currently are in the midst of fact-finding. The school district’s most recent offer to the teachers is a 5 percent raise over the next three years.

Suzi LeBaron, a science teacher and pathway director at Oakland High School, said, “Held up against the cost of living, this offer would send us economically backward.”

Commenting on the teachers’ planned action on Friday, Oakland schools Superintendent Kyla Johnson-Trammell said in a statement, “We urge them not to engage in this illegal labor action which is not sanctioned by their union.”

Johnson-Trammell said, “It is also a move that runs counter to our collective efforts to reach an agreement between the OEA and the school district as both parties are engaged, in good faith, in the fact-finding process with the California Public Employment Relations Board.”

She said, “We want our teachers to know that everyone on the Board of Education and in district leadership firmly believe that they deserve to be paid more than they currently are. We are hopeful that our teachers will remain in class supporting students on Friday.”

Johnson-Trammell added, “We are committed to working with the OEA to come to an equitable contract that works for both sides.”

© Copyright 2019 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

San Francisco CEO Among 21 Dead In Kenya Terror Attack

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) — A terror attack in Nairobi, Kenya on Tuesday left 21 people dead. One of them was Jason Spindler, who was the CEO of iDev, a tech investment firm based in San Francisco.

Militants linked to Al-Qaeda claimed responsibility for Tuesday’s attack, which happened as five heavily armed attackers held siege at a luxury hotel and shopping complex.

Spindler’s coworkers called him a visionary; they told KPIX 5 that he was in Nairobi trying to improve the quality of life for small business owners there. He would have turned 41 on Monday, Jan. 21.

Spindler was a former member of the Peace Corps as well as an investment banker.

Patricia Chin Sweeney, Spindler’s business partner at iDev, said that he showed up late to work at Citigroup in New York on 9/11 because he tried to help people during the attack.

“He stayed around and pulled people out to get them to safety,” she said. Spindler likely tried to help people in the Nairobi attack, too.

iDev is the tech investment firm that Spindler and Sweeney built up together in business school. Though the firm’s based in the Bay Area, its focus is in 45 other countries, where it invests in small businesses in developing nations.

Sweeney said iDev will continue to dream big and support small businesses in Spindler’s honor; his friends said that turning back is not something he would have done, so neither will they.

The hotel and shopping center at which the attack occurred is popular with Westerners; Sweeney said she’s been there herself when iDev first launched in Africa. She said that the company will go back in the future.

“A lot of the reason he was doing this was he believed you could invest, build businesses, that they would stabilize economies, reduce the need for terrorism, war, hatred. It’s ironic it ended this way, but when you choose these battles, you don’t always win,” said Sweeney.