Category Archives: doctors

California ER Doctor Seen On Video Mocking Patient Suspended

LOS GATOS, Calif. (AP) — A Northern California emergency room doctor has been suspended after cursing and mocking a man who said he had an anxiety attack.

The San Jose Mercury News reports that Dr. Beth Keegstra, a contract doctor with El Camino Hospital in Los Gatos, was suspended after she was recorded on June 11 questioning whether 20-year-old Samuel Bardwell was sick or just looking for drugs.

Bardwell’s father, Donald, said his son suffers anxiety attacks and takes the drug Klonopin. But the college student hadn’t picked up a prescription for two days before suffering an attack after basketball practice.

The father recorded Keegstra scoffing when Samuel Bardwell says he can’t inhale.

She replies: “you must be dead” and calls him “the least sick of all the people who are here.”

Keegstra couldn’t be reached for comment Sunday.

Doctors Rule Menstrual Cramps Can Be As Painful As Heart Attacks

CBS Local — After years of debate, doctors are publicly acknowledging the severity of pain linked to some women’s periods. With physicians admitting the pain can rival that of a heart attack, some are now questioning why more research hasn’t been done to stop the menstrual agony. Dysmenorrhea, better known as cramps, is a painful menstruation that can be severe enough to interrupt the daily routine of one in five women, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. “Men don’t get it and it hasn’t been given the centrality it should have. I do believe it’s something that should be taken care of, like anything else in medicine,” University College London’s John Guillebaud told Quartz. The professor of reproductive health says many patients are legitimately suffering pain “almost as bad as having a heart attack.” NorthShore University HealthSystem’s Frank Tu added that many physicians are taught that over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen “should be good enough” to help women get through their cramps. “There is a long history of not taking menstrual pain seriously and even writing it off as women’s hysteria. We don’t talk about menstrual health, young girls’ knowledge about menstrual health is poor,” Dr. Annalise Weckesser told The Independent last year. Physicians added that painful periods may also be a symptom of another severe condition known as endometriosis. While dysmenorrhea is treated with medication, endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body and requires surgery.

Doctors Rule Menstrual Cramps Can Be As Painful As Heart Attacks

CBS Local — After years of debate, doctors are publicly acknowledging the severity of pain linked to some women’s periods. With physicians admitting the pain can rival that of a heart attack, some are now questioning why more research hasn’t been done to stop the menstrual agony. Dysmenorrhea, better known as cramps, is a painful menstruation that can be severe enough to interrupt the daily routine of one in five women, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. “Men don’t get it and it hasn’t been given the centrality it should have. I do believe it’s something that should be taken care of, like anything else in medicine,” University College London’s John Guillebaud told Quartz. The professor of reproductive health says many patients are legitimately suffering pain “almost as bad as having a heart attack.” NorthShore University HealthSystem’s Frank Tu added that many physicians are taught that over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen “should be good enough” to help women get through their cramps. “There is a long history of not taking menstrual pain seriously and even writing it off as women’s hysteria. We don’t talk about menstrual health, young girls’ knowledge about menstrual health is poor,” Dr. Annalise Weckesser told The Independent last year. Physicians added that painful periods may also be a symptom of another severe condition known as endometriosis. While dysmenorrhea is treated with medication, endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body and requires surgery.

Doctors Rule Menstrual Cramps Can Be As Painful As Heart Attacks

CBS Local — After years of debate, doctors are publicly acknowledging the severity of pain linked to some women’s periods. With physicians admitting the pain can rival that of a heart attack, some are now questioning why more research hasn’t been done to stop the menstrual agony.

Dysmenorrhea, better known as cramps, is a painful menstruation that can be severe enough to interrupt the daily routine of one in five women, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians.

“Men don’t get it and it hasn’t been given the centrality it should have. I do believe it’s something that should be taken care of, like anything else in medicine,” University College London’s John Guillebaud told Quartz. The professor of reproductive health says many patients are legitimately suffering pain “almost as bad as having a heart attack.”

NorthShore University HealthSystem’s Frank Tu added that many physicians are taught that over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen “should be good enough” to help women get through their cramps.

“There is a long history of not taking menstrual pain seriously and even writing it off as women’s hysteria. We don’t talk about menstrual health, young girls’ knowledge about menstrual health is poor,” Dr. Annalise Weckesser told The Independent last year.

Physicians added that painful periods may also be a symptom of another severe condition known as endometriosis. While dysmenorrhea is treated with medication, endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in other areas of the body and requires surgery.

40 Percent Of Doctors, Nurses Go To Work With The Flu, Survey Finds

CBS Local — As flu season kicks into high gear, a new report is revealing the unhealthy habits of the people entrusted with keeping Americans healthy.

According to a survey of nearly 2,000 healthcare professionals, over 40 percent who say they’ve worked while sick actually had the flu as they met patients.

“The statistics are alarming. At least one earlier study has shown that patients who are exposed to a healthcare worker who is sick are five times more likely to get a healthcare-associated infection,” lead author Dr. Sophia Chiu wrote in the survey’s release.

“We recommend all healthcare facilities take steps to support and encourage their staff to not work while they are sick,” the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researcher added.

Of the more than 1,900 doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and aides polled, 414 admitted to working while experiencing flu-symptoms. 44 percent of that group reported they worked for at least three days while feeling sick with influenza-like illness (ILI).

The report, conducted during to the 2014-2015 flu season, found that pharmacists were the most likely healthcare professionals to work while having the flu. Sixty-seven percent of pharmacists polled said they’ve gone to work while having ILI. The least likely to come into work while sick were nurses. Just under 38 percent said they had come in while under the weather.

The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, said the main reasons healthcare workers gave for not calling out sick included not feeling “bad enough” to stay home, pressure to be at work to help co-workers, and not being able to find someone to cover their shift.

The CDC recommends that anyone with the flu wait 24 hours from when their fever breaks before returning to work. This year’s flu season is expected to ramp up in December before peaking in February 2018, according to CDC statistics.

40 Percent Of Doctors, Nurses Go To Work With The Flu, Survey Finds

CBS Local — As flu season kicks into high gear, a new report is revealing the unhealthy habits of the people entrusted with keeping Americans healthy. According to a survey of nearly 2,000 healthcare professionals, over 40 percent who say they’ve worked while sick actually had the flu as they met patients. “The statistics are alarming. At least one earlier study has shown that patients who are exposed to a healthcare worker who is sick are five times more likely to get a healthcare-associated infection,” lead author Dr. Sophia Chiu wrote in the survey’s release. “We recommend all healthcare facilities take steps to support and encourage their staff to not work while they are sick,” the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researcher added. Of the more than 1,900 doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and aides polled, 414 admitted to working while experiencing flu-symptoms. 44 percent of that group reported they worked for at least three days while feeling sick with influenza-like illness (ILI). The report, conducted during to the 2014-2015 flu season, found that pharmacists were the most likely healthcare professionals to work while having the flu. 67 percent of pharmacists polled said they’ve gone to work while having ILI. The least likely to come into work while sick were nurses. Just under 38 percent said they had come in while under the weather. The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, said the main reasons healthcare workers gave for not calling out sick included not feeling “bad enough” to stay home, pressure to be at work to help co-workers, and not being able to find someone to cover their shift.

The CDC recommends that anyone with the flu wait 24 hours from when their fever breaks before returning to work. This year’s flu season is expected to ramp up in December before peaking in February 2018, according to CDC statistics.