Tag Archives: CDC

CDC: 40 Percent Of U.S. Cancer Cases Linked To Being Overweight

CBS Local — A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is drawing a disturbing connection between obesity and over a dozen forms of cancer. According to the department’s latest edition of Vital Signs, at least 13 different types of the disease have been linked to being overweight or obese. U.S. health officials say 40 percent of all cancer diagnoses in the country were associated with obesity in 2014. Older Americans were at even great risk as two-thirds of the cases were in adults between 50 and 74. “A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended – and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers,” CDC director Brenda Fitzgerald said. “By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.” The findings also pointed to the number of obesity-related cancers growing over the last decade. The study found that cancers tied to obesity increased by seven percent between 2005 and 2014. That number did not include colorectal cancer. Cancers that weren’t associated with obesity declined in the U.S. by 13 percent.

“What we need to talk about is preventing cancer, eating better,” Ohio State University professor Theodore Brasky said. “Those approaches are cost effective and have a bigger impact. It’s so much easier to not get cancer than to have to deal with treating it.” According to the CDC, two out of three adults in the U.S. were overweight in 2014.

CDC: 40 Percent Of U.S. Cancer Cases Linked To Being Overweight

CBS Local — A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is drawing a disturbing connection between obesity and over a dozen forms of cancer. According to the department’s latest edition of Vital Signs, at least 13 different types of the disease have been linked to being overweight or obese. U.S. health officials say 40 percent of all cancer diagnoses in the country were associated with obesity in 2014. Older Americans were at even great risk as two-thirds of the cases were in adults between 50 and 74. “A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended – and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers,” CDC director Brenda Fitzgerald said. “By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.” The findings also pointed to the number of obesity-related cancers growing over the last decade. The study found that cancers tied to obesity increased by seven percent between 2005 and 2014. That number did not include colorectal cancer. Cancers that weren’t associated with obesity declined in the U.S. by 13 percent.

“What we need to talk about is preventing cancer, eating better,” Ohio State University professor Theodore Brasky said. “Those approaches are cost effective and have a bigger impact. It’s so much easier to not get cancer than to have to deal with treating it.” According to the CDC, two out of three adults in the U.S. were overweight in 2014.

CDC: 40 Percent Of U.S. Cancer Cases Linked To Being Overweight

CBS Local — A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is drawing a disturbing connection between obesity and over a dozen forms of cancer. According to the department’s latest edition of Vital Signs, at least 13 different types of the disease have been linked to being overweight or obese. U.S. health officials say 40 percent of all cancer diagnoses in the country were associated with obesity in 2014. Older Americans were at even great risk as two-thirds of the cases were in adults between 50 and 74. “A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended – and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers,” CDC director Brenda Fitzgerald said. “By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.” The findings also pointed to the number of obesity-related cancers growing over the last decade. The study found that cancers tied to obesity increased by seven percent between 2005 and 2014. That number did not include colorectal cancer. Cancers that weren’t associated with obesity declined in the U.S. by 13 percent.

“What we need to talk about is preventing cancer, eating better,” Ohio State University professor Theodore Brasky said. “Those approaches are cost effective and have a bigger impact. It’s so much easier to not get cancer than to have to deal with treating it.” According to the CDC, two out of three adults in the U.S. were overweight in 2014.

CDC: 40 Percent Of U.S. Cancer Cases Linked To Being Overweight

CBS Local — A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is drawing a disturbing connection between obesity and over a dozen forms of cancer. According to the department’s latest edition of Vital Signs, at least 13 different types of the disease have been linked to being overweight or obese. U.S. health officials say 40 percent of all cancer diagnoses in the country were associated with obesity in 2014. Older Americans were at even great risk as two-thirds of the cases were in adults between 50 and 74. “A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended – and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers,” CDC director Brenda Fitzgerald said. “By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.” The findings also pointed to the number of obesity-related cancers growing over the last decade. The study found that cancers tied to obesity increased by seven percent between 2005 and 2014. That number did not include colorectal cancer. Cancers that weren’t associated with obesity declined in the U.S. by 13 percent.

“What we need to talk about is preventing cancer, eating better,” Ohio State University professor Theodore Brasky said. “Those approaches are cost effective and have a bigger impact. It’s so much easier to not get cancer than to have to deal with treating it.” According to the CDC, two out of three adults in the U.S. were overweight in 2014.

Flu Hospitalizations Up: ‘Time To Get Protected Is Now’

By Joel Hillan DENVER (CBS4) – Generally, Thanksgiving marks the start of the flu season, but that’s not the case this year. Since Aug. 1, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment says 20 people have been hospitalized from the flu virus. They say that is twice the average. “Seeing as that we are already seeing sporadic cases throughout the state, the time for people to get protected is now,” said state epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy.
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CBS4’s Joel Hillan Dr. Rachel Herlihy. (credit: CBS)

She recommends getting the shot now because it takes two weeks for the vaccination to fully take effect. Dr. Julian Orenstein, a Pediatric Emergency Physician at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children, says he sees a lot of kids come to the emergency room every year with flu symptoms and that the flu vaccine is the best way to keep them out of the hospital.
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(credit: CBS)

“I am always, absolutely firm: Parents should get their kids flu vaccinations and they should get flu vaccines themselves,” said Dr. Orenstein. Just like last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is only recommending the injectable shot, not the nasal vaccine.
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(credit: CBS)

If your kids have never received a flu shot, Dr. Orenstein says they’ll need two, spaced four weeks apart for the vaccination to be fully effective. He also recommends the fundamentals: good hand washing, cover your cough, use your elbow and practice good hygiene. During last year’s flu season the CDPHE reported that 3,340 Coloradans were hospitalized with the flu. Two of those patients were children who died. Joel Hillan anchors CBS4 This Morning on weekends as well as reports stories for CBS4 News at 5 and 6 p.m. Follow Joel on Twitter @joelhillan.

Puppies Sold At Pet Stores Linked To Multistate Bacterial Outbreak

What’s the first thing you want to do when you see an adorable puppy? Probably snuggle and cuddle the heck out of it. But federal officials say there’s a multistate outbreak of a nasty bacteria going around, and it’s being spread by puppies sold at a national pet store chain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with the Ohio Department of Health and several other states, are investigating a recent spate of Campylobacter infections that appear to be connected to puppies sold through Petland.

Not feeling too hot

So far, 39 people living in seven states — Florida, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wisconsin — have laboratory-confirmed infections or symptoms. Of those cases, 12 are Petland employees who had contact with puppies sold in stores. The other 27 either recently purchased a puppy at Petland, visited a Petland, live in a home with a puppy sold through Petland — or visited someone who does — before they got sick. The most recent illness was reported on Sept. 1 this year, but reports started as far back as Sept. 15, 2016. The CDC says that Petland is cooperating with public health and animal health officials to address the outbreak.

Bad bacteria

Although most cases are associated with eating raw or undercooked meat or poultry, Campylobacter can spread through contact with dog poop (feces). It usually doesn’t hop from one person to another, however. Symptoms of infections in both people and animals include vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and fever. Humans usually recover within a week without treatment. People more likely to get a severe infection include: • People with weakened immune systems (such as people with the genetic blood disorder thalassemia or HIV or people receiving chemotherapy)
• Children younger than 5 years
• Adults 65 years and older
• Pregnant women The CDC has some handy advice to pet owners to avoid getting sick, as well as guidance for pet store workers who may come into contact with infected puppies.

More controversy?

Petland — the only major national chain that sells dogs from commercial breeders — was hit with a class-action lawsuit in July, notes The Washington Post, accusing it of defrauding customers by “guaranteeing” puppies it allegedly knew were prone to illnesses and other defects. The Animal Legal Defense Fund claims that Petland only performs cursory inspections before providing a “Health Warranty” to purchasers of puppies. Campylobacter isn’t one of the conditions customers have reported to ALDF, but the group’s director of litigation says the outbreak news is hardly surprising. “It’s not hard to see how animals raised in these cramped and unsanitary conditions, trucked hundreds of miles from puppy mills to the pet stores, intermingled with other fragile young animals and handled by numerous employees and customers could become disease vectors,” Matthew Liebman told WaPo. Petland’s CEO Joe Watson called the lawsuit’s allegations “baseless and tired.” “Regardless of where you obtain your family dog, all dogs are carbon-based life-forms, and just like our own kids, they are subject to a wide variety [of] illness,” he said in an email to WaPo. “We take every precaution possible to ensure the health of our pets.”

CDC: Backyard Chickens Mean Salmonella Outbreaks, So Wash Your Hands

In the last decade or so, raising backyard chickens has become a popular hobby. Maybe it’s due to a receession-era homesteading impulse, or people prioritizing really local food. However, live chickens and ducks have been linked to almost 1,000 known cases of Salmonella, which have sent hundreds of people to the hospital and killed one person. About one-third of those cases were in children under age 5.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been able to trace most of these cases of backyard bird bacteria to their sources, and found that 75% of people interviewed had some kind of contact with live poultry before getting sick.

The problem is that chickens can carry Salmonella strains that make humans ill, but the birds don’t get sick at all.

Among the CDC’s recommendations are that people with pet chickens not let their flocks hang out in the house, especially in the kitchen, dining areas, or the bathroom. Yes, even if your hens are really cool pets. It also recommends that flock owners and people visiting with chickens:

Wash your hands after handling poultry, or after handling clothes that you wore when working with poultry. Hand sanitizer is a good temporary option if you can’t get to a place with soap and water right away.
Avoid snuggling and smooching any birds, no matter how cute those fuzzy freshly hatched chicks might be.
Collect eggs as often as possible, discarding any that are cracked. Don’t wash eggs, but be sure to refrigerate them.
When possible, keep children under age 5, adults over age 65, and people with weakened or compromised immune systems due to illness or medical treatment (like chemotherapy or anti-rejection drugs) from handling any birds due to the risk of Salmonella.

Whole Food Recalls Cheeses Linked To Two Listeria-Related Deaths

Whole Foods has expanded a recent recall of Vulto Creamery cheese products potentially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes after health officials linked two deaths and four illnesses to the cheese made from unpasteurized raw milk.

The recall, which came after Vulto Creamery expanded its own recall late last week, covers three cheese products sold in just eight stores in Massachusetts, New…

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Going on vacation? Your guide to the vaccinations and medications you need for your travel destination

Are you sure you’ve covered your bases when it comes to vaccines and medication you may need before you go on your vacation?