Tag Archives: Cleveland Indians

FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive – 10/12

HOUR 1
gettyimages 853835614 FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive   10/12

Credit: Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

Dave flew solo today. He opened up talking about the Nationals-Cubs game and the Yankees-Indians game. He also talked about the Eagles-Panthers Thursday Night Football matchup, and broke down some numbers from the MLB postseason.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 2
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: Bogdan Bogdanovic #8 of the Sacramento Kings drives against Josh Hart #5 of the Los Angeles Lakers during their preseason game at T-Mobile Arena on October 8, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Los Angeles won 75-69. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

In the second hour, Dave looked at some peripheral story lines from the NFL season. He also discussed what to expect from the Kings this season, and had TV voice of the Kings, Grant Napear on to talk about the upcoming Kings season.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 3
851467832 FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive   10/12

(Photo by Michael Zagaris/Getty Images)

The final hour was full of guests. Matt Barrows of the Sacramento Bee was on to talk about the 49ers-Washington matchup Sunday. Sacramento Kings forward Jack Cooley joined the show at the bottom of the hour.   Listen to the whole hour here:

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Proper grocery shopping etiquette: The Drive – 10/4

HOUR 1
856436330 Proper grocery shopping etiquette: The Drive   10/4

(Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Scot Pollard joined the show today! Dave, Kayte and Scot talked about the Yankees-Twins AL Wild Card game, the NBA’s All-Star adjustments, and the Chargers issues drawing fans in Los Angeles.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 2
851467832 Proper grocery shopping etiquette: The Drive   10/4

(Photo by Michael Zagaris/San Francisco 49ers/Getty Images)

At the top of the second hour, Dave discussed his shopping habits. Dave, Kayte and Scott also talked about referee problems in the NFL, Ben Roethlisberger’s comments on Antonio Brown, and athletes suffering life-altering injuries and when the best time to retire is.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 3
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 12: Head coach David Joerger of the Sacramento Kings reacts during the first half against the LA Clippers at Staples Center on April 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.

(Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Guests filled the third hour today. Voice of the Raiders Greg Papa hopped on to talk about the Raiders upcoming game against the Ravens. After that, Kings head coach Dave Joerger joined the show to discuss the team’s first preseason game and where they’re at heading into their second preseason contest.   Listen to the whole hour here:

Indians Get AL-Best 102nd Victory In 3-1 Win Over White Sox

CLEVELAND (AP) — Jay Bruce had a two-run single, Josh Tomlin pitched into the sixth inning and the Cleveland Indians got their AL-best 102nd victory, beating the Chicago White Sox, 3-1, on Sunday in their regular-season finale. Cleveland will next play an AL Division Series against the winner of the wild-card game between the Yankees and Twins. The 102 victories were the second most in franchise history behind the 1954 team’s 111. Jose Ramirez went 2-for-2, including his AL-high 56th double, and Carlos Santana had a sacrifice fly for the Indians, who are seeking a second straight World Series appearance. Bruce’s two RBIs in the first inning gave him 100 for the second time in his career. Cleveland won 33 of its final 37 games dating to Aug. 24, when it began an AL-record 22-game winning streak. The White Sox went 67-95 in their first year under manager Rick Renteria, posting their worst record since 2013. Tomlin (10-9) tossed 5 1/3 innings of one-run ball, striking out six and giving the club five pitchers with double-digit victories. The right-hander is penciled in as the Indians’ fourth starter in the playoffs. Cody Allen worked a perfect ninth for his 30th save. Chris Volstad (1-2) walked Francisco Lindor, Jason Kipnis and Ramirez to begin his day — all scored — before settling into a groove. He allowed three runs over six innings in his second start in the majors since 2012. Rob Brantly hit a leadoff homer in the fifth to pull the White Sox within 3-1, but they only managed one hit in the final four frames against six relievers. TRAINER’S ROOM Indians: Michael Brantley, who returned from a sprained right ankle to pinch hit Saturday night, was hitless in two at-bats. He missed 50 games before returning. UP NEXT The Indians await the winner of Tuesday’s wild-card game. Game 1 of the best-of-five Division Series is Thursday at Progressive Field. Cleveland will have home-field advantage over every potential playoff foe, except for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who led the majors in wins. (© 2017 by STATS LLC and Associated Press. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of STATS LLC and Associated Press is strictly prohibited.)

Brantley Returns As Indians Lose 2-1 To White Sox

CLEVELAND (AP) — Michael Brantley spent seven weeks on the disabled list with a sprained right ankle. He only needed one at-bat to show the Indians that he was prepared for the postseason. The All-Star outfielder had a pinch-hit single in the fifth inning on Saturday night, earning a standing ovation from his teammates and a sellout crowd during Cleveland’s 2-1 loss to the White Sox. Brantley battled Chicago rookie Carson Fulmer for 10 pitches before sharply driving the ball to right field in his first action since Aug. 8. The 30-year-old had missed the previous 50 games but was activated earlier in the day. “All things considered, it seems almost miraculous to me that he was able to have the kind of at-bat that he had,” Indians manager Terry Francona said. “His level of concentration, then to fire a hit in there, that was really something. “Depending on how he feels tomorrow, we’ll walk through everything again, but I thought he was moving pretty well.” AL Central champion Cleveland locked up the best record in the AL before it stepped onto the field when Houston lost to Boston. It will play the winner of the wild-card game between the Yankees and Twins in a Division Series. The Dodgers won later Saturday to ensure they would edge Cleveland for the best record in the major leagues. The Indians will have home-field advantage throughout the playoffs unless they face Los Angeles in the World Series. Brantley’s return was effective and timely as the Indians plan on announcing their playoff roster following their regular-season finale Sunday. Brantley did not make himself available to the media. “It was like Michael didn’t miss a beat, which was incredible,” Cleveland second baseman Jason Kipnis said. “It was awesome. I was up on the railing the whole time because I know how hard he’s worked to be ready for the postseason. He wasn’t going to miss it.” Fulmer (3-1) allowed one run in five innings for Chicago, while Juan Minaya worked a perfect ninth for his ninth save. Catcher Kevan Smith drove in both White Sox runs with a single in the fourth off Indians ace Corey Kluber and a double in the fifth against Mike Clevinger (12-6). Kluber worked five innings of one-run ball to lower his ERA to an AL-best 2.25. He struck out three and threw 81 pitches in his final postseason tuneup. Kluber finished the season with an 18-4 record and 265 strikeouts, making a strong case for a second AL Cy Young Award while Boston’s Chris Sale faltered down the stretch. “When you go against Kluber, you’re facing the best, so it’s a positive no matter how you do,” Chicago manager Rick Renteria said. “He is a barometer that shows you where you’re at. So are the Indians.” BAD MEMORIES Indians RHP Trevor Bauer infamously sliced open his right pinkie finger while repairing a drone on the eve of the 2016 playoffs. After winning his career-high 17th game Friday over the White Sox, the hi-tech junkie said he plans on building a new model soon. “Let’s hope he does it after the season,” Francona said sternly. “Hopefully, we’ll stay away from all drone-related issues.” TRAINER’S ROOM White Sox: LF Nicky Delmonico (left shoulder strain), who was injured Friday while diving for a ball, was sent back to Chicago for additional tests. Indians: C Yan Gomes (right hand) was hit by a pitch in the fifth, but remained in the game. His right wrist was broken by a pitch last September. UP NEXT White Sox: RHP Chris Volstad allowed six runs over five innings in a 9-3 loss to the Angels on Sept. 26. It was his first start in the majors since 2012 with the Cubs. Indians: RHP Josh Tomlin wraps up the regular season by making his 26th start. He is 0-2 with a 10.80 ERA in three appearances against the White Sox this year. (© 2017 by STATS LLC and Associated Press. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of STATS LLC and Associated Press is strictly prohibited.)

Indians Rout White Sox 10-1

CLEVELAND (AP) — Edwin Encarnacion had a three-run double, and Jay Bruce and Jose Ramirez drove in two runs apiece, leading the AL Central champion Indians to a 10-1 win over the Chicago White Sox on Friday night. Cleveland maintained its one-game lead — and owns the tiebreaker — over Houston for the best record in the AL with two games remaining. The top seed will play the winner of the wild-card game between the Yankees and Twins in the Division Series. The Indians’ 101 victories are the second most in franchise history and set a record for wins by an AL Central team. Trevor Bauer (17-9) allowed one run over six innings, striking out seven, to win for the ninth time in his last 10 decisions. Cleveland built a 10-0 lead after three innings, aided by six walks from Mike Pelfrey (3-12) and an error by shortstop Tim Anderson. Pelfrey allowed a career-high 10 runs, seven earned, in 2 2/3 innings. (© 2017 by STATS LLC and Associated Press. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of STATS LLC and Associated Press is strictly prohibited.)

5 Things: It’s Clinching Time Across MLB!

By Sam McPherson Every MLB team’s primary goal is to make the playoffs, and last week in Major League Baseball, three teams punched tickets to October. Let’s take a look and see how they did it. Cleveland wins 22 games in a row to set new record, and then clinches division It was quite the consecutive-victory celebration on Thursday night when the Indians won their 22nd straight game to set a modern-day record. Cleveland trailed in the ninth inning at home to the Kansas City Royals before rallying to win in the tenth inning. On Friday night, however, the Royals beat the Indians, 4-3, to end the streak. Yet the next day, Cleveland recovered quickly to win, 8-4, and clinch the American League Central for the second straight season. The last time the club won its division two years in a row was in 1999. Dodgers end losing streak in San Francisco, clinch playoff spot as well For the Los Angeles organization, it was a strange turn of events, losing so many games after spending the summer barely losing any at all. However, all is right for the Dodgers now after they beat the San Francisco Giants, 5-3, at AT&T Park last Tuesday. L.A. went on to take both the road series in San Francisco and a road series in Washington over the weekend, proving that the team was, indeed, okay and ready to take on the challenge of October baseball. Speaking of the Nationals, they clinched the National League East last week The NL East is a bad division, but the Nats have been the cream of the crop nonetheless. In fact, Washington started all the clinching madness last week with a 3-2 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. This is the second season in a row and the fourth time in six years that the Nationals have won their division. However, the club has yet to even reach the NL Championship Series in that span. Could this be the year for Washington to win it all? Time will tell. The Astros join the October party themselves with first division title since 2001 Houston has a few things to celebrate in the sports world, even as the city recovers from Hurricane Harvey. The NFL’s Texans won on Thursday Night Football, and the Astros qualified for the postseason on Sunday with a 7-1 victory over the Seattle Mariners that clinched the team’s first-ever AL West pennant. Newly acquired starting pitcher Justin Verlander struck out 10 batters in the win, as Houston made the playoffs for the second time in three seasons. The Astros had qualified as a wild-card team in 2004, 2005 and 2015 since last winning a division title (when they were in the NL Central, no less). Tigers pitcher Matt Boyd almost throws a no-hit game on Sunday Detroit may miss Verlander, but Boyd did a good imitation of the former Tigers ace on Sunday against the Chicago White Sox. The Detroit pitcher entered the ninth inning with a no-hit game intact, and then he got the first two outs of the inning. Chicago’s Tim Anderson broke up the no-no with a clean double to the wall in right center field, but Tigers fans had to wonder what might have happened if Nicholas Castellanos—the Detroit third baseman, regularly—hadn’t been filling in defensively out there after the team traded away both J.D. Martinez and Justin Upton earlier this season.