Tag Archives: DACA

Nancy Pelosi Cites Interruption As Reason For Pushing DACA Legislation

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi made stops at Sac State and in San Francisco Monday, but was nearly shut down in the Bay Area. “We are immigrant youth and undocumented and unafraid,” shouted a youth group who disrupted Pelosi’s speech. For the next 40 minutes, they turned the tables on the Democratic congresswoman accusing her of paying lip service to saving the nation’s 800,000 immigrants who came here as children while deportations of their families continue. “You’ve cut off the Dreamers who are here to speak. I understand, and you’ve had your time,” she said in response to the backlash. Exasperated, shaken, and frustrated Pelosi finally left. The Trump Administration announced a drawdown of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program earlier this month. The program began during the Obama Administration as a way to shield children of parents who entered the country illegally from deportation. “I understand their fears that they have and say that to the president, ‘You frighten people.’ We’ve got to get this bill now,” she told CBS13 after stopping in Sacramento. Pelosi, in her home city, called for legislation that would protect young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children or by parents who overstayed visas. At Sacramento State, it was nothing but applause for Reps. Pelosi and Doris Matsui. The lawmakers are calling on support for the Dream Act. “We must have a comprehensive immigration reform to protect everyone,” Pelosi said. Dreamers took to the podium to garner support from lawmakers, showing that the program works. “My name is Jesus Limon. I’m a Dreamer, I am a DACA recipient, and I’m a college professor,” said Limon, a professor at Sacramento State. But many Dreamers say this is only the first step. “What would happen if I go outside and get I deported. What would happen to my family? What would happen to my parents or my brothers? said Marisela Hernandez, who is also working at Sacramento City College. Pelosi said that it is the first step, which is why she’s urging Congress to pass it and plans to continue to fight for Dreamers and their families. Since announcing plans to halt DACA, President Donald Trump has held meetings with Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer to discuss renewing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and increasing border security. About 70 percent of Americans are in favor of some kind of agreement according to Pelosi, but the question is, can they come up with a deal both sides can agree on by October 1st? That’s the deadline she has given for the proposal. The Democrats say a deal has been reached, but the White House denies it.

Young Immigrants Shout Down Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has been shouted down at a San Francisco event by young immigrants protesting her conversations with President Donald Trump on immigration policy. The Democratic leader was barely able to speak over the chorus of chants Monday, including shouts of “undocumented and unafraid.” At one point, she said, “Just stop it.” Pelosi is in her home city to call for legislation that would protect young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children or by parents who overstayed visas. Trump recently announced plans to halt a program giving them temporary legal status. He’s since held meetings with Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer to discuss renewing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and increasing border security. The Democrats say a deal has been reached, but the White House denies it. Copyright 2017 The Associated Press.

Demonstrators Shout Down Pelosi At San Francisco DREAM Act Event

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A vocal group of undocumented youths and their supporters drowned out House Minority Nancy Pelosi Monday at a news conference where she was calling on the Trump administration to immediately pass the DREAM Act. The event began calmly with a smiling Pelosi at the podium surrounded by Congresswoman Barbara Lee and Congressman Jared Huffman, community leaders and other Dreamers. She had began her speech, calling dreamers courageous. “Our nation’s dreamers are an inspiration to all of us,” she said. “With their courage and their patriotism. They embody the promise of America… Of the American Dream… Make American dream again,” Pelosi said to applause from the partisan crowd.

But then the group stormed in carrying a banner, signs and chanting — “We undocumented youth demand a clean bill … We undocumented youth demand that you do not sell out our community and our values …We undocumented youth will not be a bargaining chip for Trump.” Many of the demonstrators were carrying signs reading “Democrats are Deporters.”

Pelosi unsuccessfully attempted to calm down the chanting students. “You’ve had your say, and it’s beautiful music to our ears,” Pelosi said. But when they interrupted again, she shouted “Just stop it now!” Moments later, she was forced to leave the news conference. Meanwhile in San Francisco federal court, six immigrants brought to the United States as children who became teachers, graduate students and a lawyer sued the Trump administration on over its decision to end a program shielding them from deportation. The lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco alleges the move violated the constitutional rights of immigrants who lack legal status and provided information about themselves to the U.S. government so they could participate in the program. “The consequences are potentially catastrophic,” said Jesse Gabriel, a lawyer for the plaintiffs. “These people can very powerfully and very clearly communicate the extent to which they organized their lives around this program.” The lawsuit joins others filed over President Donald Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which has allowed nearly 800,000 immigrants to obtain work permits and deportation protection since 2012. More than a dozen states from Maine to California have sued over the administration’s decision to phase out the program, alleging similar constitutional violations. So has the University of California system. Gabriel said the impact of Trump’s decision directly weighed on his clients’ personal lives and decisions they made to advance their careers in this U.S. He said Dulce Garcia is a 34-year-old lawyer in San Diego who came to the United States from Mexico when she was four years old. She recently signed a lease for an office and hired employees because she believed she could stay and work in the U.S. under the program, Gabriel said. “Now, the government is totally pulling out the rug from under her,” he said. The plaintiffs also include teachers, a medical student and a law student. They are from Mexico and Thailand. Department of Justice spokesman Devin O’Malley blamed the Obama administration for starting the program and said the agency will defend Trump’s decision. “It was the previous administration’s arbitrary circumvention of Congress that got us to this point,” he said. “The Department of Justice looks forward to defending this Administration’s position and restoring respect for the rule of law.” TM and © Copyright 2017 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2017 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Colleges Offering Legal Tips, Hotlines Amid DACA Uncertainty

BERKELEY (AP) – Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high. Amid the uncertainty, colleges and universities are stepping up efforts to protect students enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, telling them to be hopeful but plan for the worst. Harvard University has opened a round-the-clock emergency hotline for immigrants in the program. The University of Illinois at Chicago has posted advice on what to do if federal agents show up on campus. UC Berkeley, the University of San Francisco and many other campuses are offering free legal advice to immigrant students now facing fears of deportation. Nearly sixty college and university presidents sent a letter urging congressional leaders to make the program permanent out of “moral imperative and a national necessity.” An estimated 350,000 of the country’s nearly 800,000 DACA recipients are enrolled in school, most at colleges or universities, according to a 46-state survey this year by the advocacy group Center for American Progress. Under the program, they were protected from deportation and allowed to legally work in the United States with two-year permits. The top congressional Democrats, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York and Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, emerged from a White House dinner Wednesday to say they had reached a deal with President Donald Trump to save DACA. But amid backlash from conservative Republicans, Trump said Thursday that they were “fairly close” but nothing had been agreed to. It was the latest in a confusing back-and-forth on the subject that started last week when the Trump administration announced it was rescinding the program, but gave Congress six months to come up with a legislative fix. “I don’t think anybody can put much faith in the statement that there is a deal, because so much can change,” said John Trasvina, dean of the University of San Francisco School of Law and an immigration expert who worked in Washington under the Clinton and Obama administrations. “I’ve seen tons of times when people think they have an immigration deal, and then it goes away.” Under the Trump administration plan, those already enrolled in DACA remain covered until their two-year permits expire. If their permits expire before March, 5, 2018, they can renew them for another two years as long as they apply by Oct. 5. But the program isn’t accepting new applications. The University of San Francisco, which has about 80 DACA recipients, is advising students to adhere to that deadline and is raising money to help pay the $495 renewal fee.

Despite reassurances from schools that they’ll be able to continue attending classes, many students are anxious. They’re worried about how they’ll pay for school if they can’t work. Ana Maciel, a 23-year-old who works full time to put herself through a University of San Francisco education Master’s program, says she’s been on “an emotional roller coaster.” She fears being deported to Mexico, the country she left at age 3, and wonders if it’s smart to keep investing in school if she can’t work afterward. “Is this what I should spend my money on?” Maciel says about her $8,000 tuition. “Everything is up in the air.” Trump’s DACA announcement on Sept. 5 came after 10 Republican attorneys general threatened to sue in an attempt to halt the program. They were led by Attorney General Ken Paxton in Texas, which has the second-highest number of DACA recipients after California. Three days after Trump announced the administration was phasing out the program, the Arizona attorney general brought a separate lawsuit that claims the state’s universities cannot provide in-state tuition rates for DACA recipients. Attorney General Mark Brnovich says the schools are violating Arizona law which makes it clear in-state tuition is eligible only to those with legal immigration status. The schools are vowing to fight back. And critics of the program were swift to denounce the possibility of a deal in Congress. Numbers USA denounced the prospect of making a deal on border security to provide “amnesty for the so called ‘dreamers’ to compete and take jobs from Americans and those here legally.” Meanwhile, immigrants are fearful of being sent back to countries they don’t consider home. Andrea Aguilera, a Dominican University junior in suburban Chicago, worries about being deported and separated from family members, some of whom are citizens. She was illegally brought across the Mexican border at age 4. “You never know what can happen under this administration. We do want to feel relief. We’ve been fighting for something more permanent for a really long time,” she said. “It seems like it’s a game (to political leaders). They don’t realize how many peoples’ lives are being affected by this.” At UC Berkeley, Burmese-Taiwanese national Amy Lin, a 23-year-old doctoral student in the university’s ethnic studies department, has set up an emergency phone tree for DACA students. She fears Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials might come knocking. “The university says it doesn’t allow ICE agents on campus, but that doesn’t mean they won’t come in,” said Lin, who was brought to the U.S. illegally at age 12. University of California President Janet Napolitano filed a lawsuit last Friday that’s one of several high-profile legal challenges to Trump’s decision. Napolitano helped create the program in 2012 as Homeland Security secretary under President Barack Obama. The 10 schools in the UC system have about 4,000 students without legal permission to stay in the U.S. UC schools are among those offering student loans to DACA students, and they’ve directed campus police not to question or detain individuals based on their immigration status. The University of Illinois at Chicago, which has hundreds of DACA students, has posted online instructions for students and security staff to call campus police immediately if anyone, including federal agents, comes on campus and starts asking questions. “We have to follow the law, obviously,” said UIC Provost Susan Poser, but “we’re going to do everything we can to support (students).” At Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, president Elizabeth Kiss plans to invite DACA students to her home to meet with an attorney. Georgia bars in-state tuition rates for students without legal immigration status. “I have no intention of picking a fight with the Georgia Legislature,” said Kiss. “I also have to keep students safe and support their well-being.” Copyright 2017 The Associated Press.

Cal, USF Among Schools Helping Immigrants Amid DACA Confusion

BERKELEY (AP) — Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high. Amid the uncertainty, colleges and universities are stepping up efforts to protect students enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, telling them to be hopeful but plan for the worst. Harvard University has opened a round-the-clock emergency hotline for immigrants in the program. The University of Illinois at Chicago has posted advice on what to do if federal agents show up on campus. UC Berkeley, the University of San Francisco and many other campuses are offering free legal advice to immigrant students now facing fears of deportation. Nearly sixty college and university presidents sent a letter urging congressional leaders to make the program permanent out of “moral imperative and a national necessity.” An estimated 350,000 of the country’s nearly 800,000 DACA recipients are currently enrolled in school, most at colleges or universities, according to a 46-state survey this year by the advocacy group Center for American Progress. Under the program, they were protected from deportation and allowed to legally work in the United States with two-year permits. The top congressional Democrats, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York and Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, emerged from a White House dinner Wednesday to say they had reached a deal with President Donald Trump to save DACA. But amid backlash from conservative Republicans, Trump said Thursday that they were “fairly close” but nothing had been agreed to. It was the latest in a confusing back-and-forth on the subject that started last week when the Trump administration announced it was rescinding the program, but gave Congress six months to come up with a legislative fix. “I don’t think anybody can put much faith in the statement that there is a deal, because so much can change,” said John Trasvina, dean of the University of San Francisco School of Law and an immigration expert who worked in Washington under the Clinton and Obama administrations. “I’ve seen tons of times when people think they have an immigration deal, and then it goes away.” Under the Trump administration plan, those already enrolled in DACA remain covered until their two-year permits expire. If their permits expire before March, 5, 2018, they can renew them for another two years as long as they apply by Oct. 5. But the program isn’t accepting new applications. The University of San Francisco, which has about 80 DACA recipients, is advising students to adhere to that deadline and is raising money to help pay the $495 renewal fee. Despite reassurances from schools that they’ll be able to continue attending classes, many students are anxious. They’re worried about how they’ll pay for school if they can’t work. Ana Maciel, a 23-year-old who works full time to put herself through a University of San Francisco education Master’s program, says she’s been on “an emotional roller coaster.” She fears being deported to Mexico, the country she left at age 3, and wonders if it’s smart to keep investing in school if she can’t work afterward. “Is this what I should spend my money on?” Maciel says about her $8,000 tuition. “Everything is up in the air.” Trump’s DACA announcement on Sept. 5 came after 10 Republican attorneys general threatened to sue in an attempt to halt the program. They were led by Attorney General Ken Paxton in Texas, which has the second-highest number of DACA recipients after California. Three days after Trump announced the administration was phasing out the program, the Arizona attorney general brought a separate lawsuit that claims the state’s universities cannot provide in-state tuition rates for DACA recipients. Attorney General Mark Brnovich says the schools are violating Arizona law which makes it clear in-state tuition is eligible only to those with legal immigration status. The schools are vowing to fight back. And critics of the program were swift to denounce the possibility of a deal in Congress. Numbers USA denounced the prospect of making a deal on border security to provide “amnesty for the so called ‘dreamers’ to compete and take jobs from Americans and those here legally.” Meanwhile, immigrants are fearful of being sent back to countries they don’t consider home. Andrea Aguilera, a Dominican University junior in suburban Chicago, worries about being deported and separated from family members, some of whom are citizens. She was illegally brought across the Mexican border at age 4. “You never know what can happen under this administration. We do want to feel relief. We’ve been fighting for something more permanent for a really long time,” she said. “It seems like it’s a game (to political leaders). They don’t realize how many peoples’ lives are being affected by this.” At UC Berkeley, Burmese-Taiwanese national Amy Lin, a 23-year-old doctoral student in the university’s ethnic studies department, has set up an emergency phone tree for DACA students. She fears Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials might come knocking. “The university says it doesn’t allow ICE agents on campus, but that doesn’t mean they won’t come in,” said Lin, who was brought to the U.S. illegally at age 12. University of California President Janet Napolitano filed a lawsuit last Friday that’s one of several high-profile legal challenges to Trump’s decision. Napolitano helped create the program in 2012 as Homeland Security secretary under President Barack Obama. The 10 schools in the UC system have about 4,000 students without legal permission to stay in the U.S. UC schools are among those offering student loans to DACA students, and they’ve directed campus police not to question or detain individuals based on their immigration status. The University of Illinois at Chicago, which has hundreds of DACA students, has posted online instructions for students and security staff to call campus police immediately if anyone, including federal agents, comes on campus and starts asking questions. “We have to follow the law, obviously,” said UIC Provost Susan Poser, but “we’re going to do everything we can to support (students).” At Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, president Elizabeth Kiss plans to invite DACA students to her home to meet with an attorney. Georgia bars in-state tuition rates for students without legal immigration status. “I have no intention of picking a fight with the Georgia Legislature,” said Kiss. “I also have to keep students safe and support their well-being.” © Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

San Jose Sues Trump, Claiming DACA Rescission Is Harming The City

SAN JOSE (KPIX 5) — San Jose is suing President Trump for moving to rescind Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), claiming that his action is unconstitutional and is causing harm to the city, residents and employers. On Thursday, San Jose filed a complaint alleging rescission of DACA has already hurt the city, its residents and city employees, some of whom are DACA recipients. California is home to more than a quarter of all DACA recipients, known as “dreamers” and at least 23,000 dreamers live in Santa Clara County, with many residing in the county’s largest city, San Jose. “The City would suffer tangible losses from the Trump Administration’s actions given the significant services, work product, and taxes that these employees currently contribute to their community,” city officials said. The complaint was filed less than a day after President Trump met with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and agreed to protect certain immigrants brought illegally into the U.S. as children and enhancements to U.S. border security. San Jose is believed to be the first city to sue Trump over the rescission of DACA. Since the change was announced on September 5 by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, already the University of California and 15 U.S. states — including California — have sued Trump over the change. The Trump administration is giving Congress six months to come up with a legislative fix before the government stops renewing permits for people who are already covered by the program. In a statement following the Trump administration’s announcement to rescind DACA, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccadro said, “Punting the issue to Congress, without any affirmative leadership to enact a legislative solution, amounts to a cowardly cop-out, placing the futures of these young women and men in serious jeopardy.” Related: Pelosi, Schumer Reach Agreement With Trump On DACA Throughout his campaign and presidency, Trump made disparaging comments about immigrants, but he also made numerous statements sympathetic to DACA recipients. “You have 800,000 young people brought here, no fault of there own. So we’re working on a plan, we’ll see how it works out,” Trump told reporters on Thursday. The president said via Twitter on Thursday, “Does anybody really want to throw out good, educated and accomplished young people who have jobs, some serving in the military? Really!…..” But the damage caused by announcing plans to end the DACA program has already been felt in San Jose, according to the complaint. “For San Jose, the ability to hire DACA recipients has been extremely beneficial. San Jose, like the rest of the Silicon Valley, has the need for a skilled work force. Unemployment in Santa Clara County is low and competition for employees is fierce. When DACA was enacted, San Jose was able to hire DACA grantees. San Jose spent time and resources training these employees and they hold jobs vital to the operation of San Jose,” the complaint reads. The complaint describes how Silicon Valley companies like Apple, Cisco, Adobe, Facebook, and Google, among others, hired DACA recipients to meet the need for skilled workers and claims those companies would be negatively impacted if the program is rescinded. The move to rescind DACA, the complaint alleges, means that the city has had to prepare for the possibility that the U.S. Congress won’t come to an agreement on DACA by March 5, 2018 and that the city will no longer be able to employ DACA recipients because they are no longer legally allowed to work in the country. At the same time, the complaint states, it is illegal for San Jose to terminate employees because of their nationality or immigration status. The city has not only had to divert resources toward planning for the potential end of DACA and loss of city workers, but because of the taxes that DACA recipients pay, San Jose is also facing loss of tax revenues, according to the complaint. The lawsuit claims that Trump and Acting Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Elaine Duke, unlawfully targeted individuals for discriminatory treatment based on their national origin. The city is seeking a declaration from the court that the rescission of DACA is unconstitutional and seeks an injunction prohibiting DACA’s rescission and prohibiting deportation of DACA recipients. By Hannah Albarazi – Follow her on Twitter: @hannahalbarazi.

Trump’s High-Profile Backers Chide Him Over Prospect of DACA Deal

WASHINGTON — Ann Coulter tweeted early on Thursday morning, “At this point, who DOESN’T want Trump impeached?” That was just one of a string of critical comments she made about Trump — ranging from mocking his propensity for getting “rolled” to snarking that Carrot Top would be more likely to build the wall. For much... Read more »

Trump Says Deal Is Nearing On Protecting Young Immigrants

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump says he’s “fairly close” to reaching a deal with congressional leaders on protections for young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children. But the president says he needs “massive border security.” Trump spoke Thursday morning — after denying assertions by Democratic leaders that they reached an agreement with him on the so-called DACA program.

In a statement, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi insist they agreed, with Trump, to “enshrine the protections of DACA into law quickly” and to work out a package on border security — excluding Trump’s planned wall along the U.S. southern border. Trump told reporters Thursday morning that House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agree with him on DACA.

That’s after Trump tweeted early Thursday that “no deal was made last night” on the issue. Copyright 2017 The Associated Press.

Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer Say They’ve Reached Deal With Trump on Young Immigrants

WASHINGTON — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said that they have made a deal with President Trump on legislation to address young undocumented immigrants, and that it does not include funding to build a border wall. “We agreed to enshrine the protections of DACA into law quickly, and to... Read more »