Tag Archives: New York Yankees

New York Yankees Invest in eSports Holding Firm Backed by Ex-NBA Star Rick Fox

The Bronx Bombers are the latest pro sports club to take a bite of the eSports apple. The New York Yankees have made an equity investment in Vision Esports, an investment company that is the largest shareholder of three eSports-related companies: Echo Fox, founded by former NBA all-star Rick Fox, which fields 10 competitive-gaming teams; […]

Five Things You Missed: Yankees, Dodgers One Win from World Series

By Andrew Kahn The Cubs fought off elimination on Wednesday to force tonight’s Game 5. Clayton Kershaw will face Jose Quintana at Wrigley Field. The Yankees won their third straight to take a 3-2 lead against the Astros. That series moves back to Houston, with Game 6 on Friday. 1. No place like home No team in the American League had a better home record than the Yankees this season (51-30). After Wednesday’s 5-0 win over the Astros, New York is now 6-0 at Yankee Stadium in these playoffs. The atmosphere in the Bronx has been undeniably electric. It’s easy to cheer positive results, but the Yankee fans have remained loud and encouraging when things haven’t been going so well. Joe Girardi said this series has been as loud as he’s heard this park, which opened in 2009. Chase Headley compared it to a college football game, with fans going crazy throughout. It helps that the Yankees have taken advantage of the homer-friendly environment. They hit five home runs in the three games at Yankee Stadium this series; the Astros have not hit any. Of course, the series goes back to Houston for Game 6 on Friday. The Astros have also not lost at home yet this postseason (4-0), and the Yanks were the only playoff team to post a losing record on the road this year. Home field advantage in the World Series is based simply on regular season record; the Yankees would start on the road no matter their opponent; Houston would have the edge over Chicago but not Los Angeles. 2. Turner’s time Entering yesterday’s game, only two players with at least 90 postseason plate appearances had a better OPS than Justin Turner: Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth. Turner is behind only Gehrig in on-base percentage for anyone with more than 60 plate appearances. This is the same player who was nothing more than a solid utility man for the Mets for three years before they gave up on him. The 32-year-old has become a star in Los Angeles. Turner hit a walk-off home run in Game 2 and reached base four times yesterday, adding another home run. It’s been a team effort for the Dodgers in this series and all season, but Turner is their best hitter. 3. Baby Bombers The Baby Bombers—Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez, and Greg Bird—have certainly not been overwhelmed by October’s bright lights. The trio drove in four of the Yankees’ five runs on Wednesday. Judge and Sanchez were right in the middle of New York’s big comeback in Game 4. With the Yanks down 4-0, Judge homered to lead off the seventh, and Sanchez hit a sac fly. Judge’s double tied it the next inning and Sanchez’s double gave them the lead. Bird walked three times in the game. They are young (25 or under), large (Sanchez is the shortest at 6’2”; Bird the lightest at 220), and love playing together. They have not performed flawlessly—through 11 playoff games, the trio has struck out a combined 56 times, with Judge accounting for 24—but what Yankee fans once viewed as the future core has proven to be a very productive present. 4. Seager’s subs Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager getting left off the NLCS roster because of a back injury could have been a devastating blow. His replacements have made sure it hasn’t been. Charlie Culberson played short the first two games against the Cubs. He hit a sac fly to tie Game 1 and later doubled and scored a run. He doubled and scored the tying run in the fifth inning of Game 2. Chris Taylor filled in with right-handers on the mound, homering and tripling in Game 3 and drawing a couple of walks in Game 4, while playing very good defense. Seager, last season’s Rookie of the Year, could return if the Dodgers make the World Series. 5. Not done yet That the Dodgers were unable to pull off the sweep last night was not surprising. In the wild card era, only two teams have swept their way into the World Series (the Royals in 2014 and the Rockies in 2007). They’ll send Kershaw to the hill to try and win their 23rd pennant, which would tie them with the Giants for most in National League history. The Cubs will likely need their starter, Quintana, to go deep in the game to give them a chance. Their best reliever, Wade Davis, is unavailable after throwing 48 pitches last night, and the rest of the bullpen has been shaky. The potentially good news for Chicago is that its star hitters, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo, are a combined 4-for-29 in this series with no extra-base hits. Bryant in particular has been struggling (eight strikeouts in 14 plate appearances), but if he and/or Rizzo can get right in a hurry they could carry the offense. Houston has been swallowed by the Yankees’ momentum but their aforementioned success at home is comforting. Plus, the Astros will have one of the best pitchers in baseball on the mound in Justin Verlander. The late summer acquisition threw a complete game against the Yanks in Game 2. Of course, their bats will have to be better to win two in a row. The best offense in the regular season has stalled a bit in this series; the Astros have scored just nine runs in five games. Josh Reddick has been in the two-hole for four of the games and is 0-for-17. Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Yankees, Dodgers One Win from World Series

By Andrew Kahn The Cubs fought off elimination on Wednesday to force tonight’s Game 5. Clayton Kershaw will face Jose Quintana at Wrigley Field. The Yankees won their third straight to take a 3-2 lead against the Astros. That series moves back to Houston, with Game 6 on Friday. 1. No place like home No team in the American League had a better home record than the Yankees this season (51-30). After Wednesday’s 5-0 win over the Astros, New York is now 6-0 at Yankee Stadium in these playoffs. The atmosphere in the Bronx has been undeniably electric. It’s easy to cheer positive results, but the Yankee fans have remained loud and encouraging when things haven’t been going so well. Joe Girardi said this series has been as loud as he’s heard this park, which opened in 2009. Chase Headley compared it to a college football game, with fans going crazy throughout. It helps that the Yankees have taken advantage of the homer-friendly environment. They hit five home runs in the three games at Yankee Stadium this series; the Astros have not hit any. Of course, the series goes back to Houston for Game 6 on Friday. The Astros have also not lost at home yet this postseason (4-0), and the Yanks were the only playoff team to post a losing record on the road this year. Home field advantage in the World Series is based simply on regular season record; the Yankees would start on the road no matter their opponent; Houston would have the edge over Chicago but not Los Angeles. 2. Turner’s time Entering yesterday’s game, only two players with at least 90 postseason plate appearances had a better OPS than Justin Turner: Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth. Turner is behind only Gehrig in on-base percentage for anyone with more than 60 plate appearances. This is the same player who was nothing more than a solid utility man for the Mets for three years before they gave up on him. The 32-year-old has become a star in Los Angeles. Turner hit a walk-off home run in Game 2 and reached base four times yesterday, adding another home run. It’s been a team effort for the Dodgers in this series and all season, but Turner is their best hitter. 3. Baby Bombers The Baby Bombers—Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez, and Greg Bird—have certainly not been overwhelmed by October’s bright lights. The trio drove in four of the Yankees’ five runs on Wednesday. Judge and Sanchez were right in the middle of New York’s big comeback in Game 4. With the Yanks down 4-0, Judge homered to lead off the seventh, and Sanchez hit a sac fly. Judge’s double tied it the next inning and Sanchez’s double gave them the lead. Bird walked three times in the game. They are young (25 or under), large (Sanchez is the shortest at 6’2”; Bird the lightest at 220), and love playing together. They have not performed flawlessly—through 11 playoff games, the trio has struck out a combined 56 times, with Judge accounting for 24—but what Yankee fans once viewed as the future core has proven to be a very productive present. 4. Seager’s subs Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager getting left off the NLCS roster because of a back injury could have been a devastating blow. His replacements have made sure it hasn’t been. Charlie Culberson played short the first two games against the Cubs. He hit a sac fly to tie Game 1 and later doubled and scored a run. He doubled and scored the tying run in the fifth inning of Game 2. Chris Taylor filled in with right-handers on the mound, homering and tripling in Game 3 and drawing a couple of walks in Game 4, while playing very good defense. Seager, last season’s Rookie of the Year, could return if the Dodgers make the World Series. 5. Not done yet That the Dodgers were unable to pull off the sweep last night was not surprising. In the wild card era, only two teams have swept their way into the World Series (the Royals in 2014 and the Rockies in 2007). They’ll send Kershaw to the hill to try and win their 23rd pennant, which would tie them with the Giants for most in National League history. The Cubs will likely need their starter, Quintana, to go deep in the game to give them a chance. Their best reliever, Wade Davis, is unavailable after throwing 48 pitches last night, and the rest of the bullpen has been shaky. The potentially good news for Chicago is that its star hitters, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo, are a combined 4-for-29 in this series with no extra-base hits. Bryant in particular has been struggling (eight strikeouts in 14 plate appearances), but if he and/or Rizzo can get right in a hurry they could carry the offense. Houston has been swallowed by the Yankees’ momentum but their aforementioned success at home is comforting. Plus, the Astros will have one of the best pitchers in baseball on the mound in Justin Verlander. The late summer acquisition threw a complete game against the Yanks in Game 2. Of course, their bats will have to be better to win two in a row. The best offense in the regular season has stalled a bit in this series; the Astros have scored just nine runs in five games. Josh Reddick has been in the two-hole for four of the games and is 0-for-17. Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Yankees, Dodgers One Win from World Series

By Andrew Kahn The Cubs fought off elimination on Wednesday to force tonight’s Game 5. Clayton Kershaw will face Jose Quintana at Wrigley Field. The Yankees won their third straight to take a 3-2 lead against the Astros. That series moves back to Houston, with Game 6 on Friday. 1. No place like home No team in the American League had a better home record than the Yankees this season (51-30). After Wednesday’s 5-0 win over the Astros, New York is now 6-0 at Yankee Stadium in these playoffs. The atmosphere in the Bronx has been undeniably electric. It’s easy to cheer positive results, but the Yankee fans have remained loud and encouraging when things haven’t been going so well. Joe Girardi said this series has been as loud as he’s heard this park, which opened in 2009. Chase Headley compared it to a college football game, with fans going crazy throughout. It helps that the Yankees have taken advantage of the homer-friendly environment. They hit five home runs in the three games at Yankee Stadium this series; the Astros have not hit any. Of course, the series goes back to Houston for Game 6 on Friday. The Astros have also not lost at home yet this postseason (4-0), and the Yanks were the only playoff team to post a losing record on the road this year. Home field advantage in the World Series is based simply on regular season record; the Yankees would start on the road no matter their opponent; Houston would have the edge over Chicago but not Los Angeles. 2. Turner’s time Entering yesterday’s game, only two players with at least 90 postseason plate appearances had a better OPS than Justin Turner: Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth. Turner is behind only Gehrig in on-base percentage for anyone with more than 60 plate appearances. This is the same player who was nothing more than a solid utility man for the Mets for three years before they gave up on him. The 32-year-old has become a star in Los Angeles. Turner hit a walk-off home run in Game 2 and reached base four times yesterday, adding another home run. It’s been a team effort for the Dodgers in this series and all season, but Turner is their best hitter. 3. Baby Bombers The Baby Bombers—Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez, and Greg Bird—have certainly not been overwhelmed by October’s bright lights. The trio drove in four of the Yankees’ five runs on Wednesday. Judge and Sanchez were right in the middle of New York’s big comeback in Game 4. With the Yanks down 4-0, Judge homered to lead off the seventh, and Sanchez hit a sac fly. Judge’s double tied it the next inning and Sanchez’s double gave them the lead. Bird walked three times in the game. They are young (25 or under), large (Sanchez is the shortest at 6’2”; Bird the lightest at 220), and love playing together. They have not performed flawlessly—through 11 playoff games, the trio has struck out a combined 56 times, with Judge accounting for 24—but what Yankee fans once viewed as the future core has proven to be a very productive present. 4. Seager’s subs Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager getting left off the NLCS roster because of a back injury could have been a devastating blow. His replacements have made sure it hasn’t been. Charlie Culberson played short the first two games against the Cubs. He hit a sac fly to tie Game 1 and later doubled and scored a run. He doubled and scored the tying run in the fifth inning of Game 2. Chris Taylor filled in with right-handers on the mound, homering and tripling in Game 3 and drawing a couple of walks in Game 4, while playing very good defense. Seager, last season’s Rookie of the Year, could return if the Dodgers make the World Series. 5. Not done yet That the Dodgers were unable to pull off the sweep last night was not surprising. In the wild card era, only two teams have swept their way into the World Series (the Royals in 2014 and the Rockies in 2007). They’ll send Kershaw to the hill to try and win their 23rd pennant, which would tie them with the Giants for most in National League history. The Cubs will likely need their starter, Quintana, to go deep in the game to give them a chance. Their best reliever, Wade Davis, is unavailable after throwing 48 pitches last night, and the rest of the bullpen has been shaky. The potentially good news for Chicago is that its star hitters, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo, are a combined 4-for-29 in this series with no extra-base hits. Bryant in particular has been struggling (eight strikeouts in 14 plate appearances), but if he and/or Rizzo can get right in a hurry they could carry the offense. Houston has been swallowed by the Yankees’ momentum but their aforementioned success at home is comforting. Plus, the Astros will have one of the best pitchers in baseball on the mound in Justin Verlander. The late summer acquisition threw a complete game against the Yanks in Game 2. Of course, their bats will have to be better to win two in a row. The best offense in the regular season has stalled a bit in this series; the Astros have scored just nine runs in five games. Josh Reddick has been in the two-hole for four of the games and is 0-for-17. Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Court Reversal: The Lo-Down – 10/12

Hour 1
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 03: Aaron Judge #99 of the New York Yankees celebrates with teammate Brett Gardner #11 after hitting a two run home run against Jose Berrios #17 of the Minnesota Twins during the fourth inning in the American League Wild Card Game at Yankee Stadium on October 3, 2017 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

(Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

In the first hour of the Lo-Down Damien and Jason talk about last night’s Yankees win and give their predictions for the ALCS.  Next, Jabari Davis joined the guys to preview the upcoming NBA  season.  The Guys also talked about the bizarre situation with Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie getting suspended by the New York Giants.  All that and more on The Lo-Down exclusively on Sports 1140 KHTK daily from 12-3PM.   Hour 2
Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals hits a single one-run RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning at Nationals Park on April 10, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo Credit: Matt Hazlett/Getty Images)

In the second hour of the show Dan Steinberg, Washington Post, came on the show to talk about the Washington Nationals Game 5 tonight, and DC sports in general.  Next, the guys received some breaking news with Ezekiel Elliott and The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals vacating his injunction, and what it means for Elliott, the Cowboys, and the NFL.  All that and more on The Lo-Down exclusively on Sports 1140 KHTK daily from 12-3PM.   Hour 3
gettyimages 830923616 e1503080600174 Court Reversal: The Lo Down   10/12

Credit: Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

In the final hour of the Lo-Down Nate Lundy, Fantasy Football Hour, joins the show to help you get your fantasy football line up set up for this week’s games.  The guys then talked about Kyrie taking some possible shots at Cleveland. At the end of the show Damien and Jason gave their predictions for tonight’s Thursday Night Football game and the Kings preseason game.  All that and more on The Lo-Down exclusively on Sports 1140 KHTK daily from 12-3PM. You can Subscribe, Rate, and Review The Lo-Down Podcast HERE, and you can Like Us on Facebook.

FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive – 10/12

HOUR 1
gettyimages 853835614 FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive   10/12

Credit: Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

Dave flew solo today. He opened up talking about the Nationals-Cubs game and the Yankees-Indians game. He also talked about the Eagles-Panthers Thursday Night Football matchup, and broke down some numbers from the MLB postseason.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 2
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: Bogdan Bogdanovic #8 of the Sacramento Kings drives against Josh Hart #5 of the Los Angeles Lakers during their preseason game at T-Mobile Arena on October 8, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Los Angeles won 75-69. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

In the second hour, Dave looked at some peripheral story lines from the NFL season. He also discussed what to expect from the Kings this season, and had TV voice of the Kings, Grant Napear on to talk about the upcoming Kings season.   Listen to the whole hour here:   HOUR 3
851467832 FA Cup and airport trivia: The Drive   10/12

(Photo by Michael Zagaris/Getty Images)

The final hour was full of guests. Matt Barrows of the Sacramento Bee was on to talk about the 49ers-Washington matchup Sunday. Sacramento Kings forward Jack Cooley joined the show at the bottom of the hour.   Listen to the whole hour here:

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn

Five Things You Missed: Astros, Dodgers Await Opponents

By Andrew Kahn Two teams have moved to within one step of the World Series, while two more could join them as early as today. Here is what you need to know. 1. Strasburg Playoff Controversy, Part II The Washington Nationals, and not Stephen Strasburg, received the bulk of the criticism when the pitcher was shut down before the 2012 playoffs. He may not be as fortunate this time around. Tuesday’s rain-out in Chicago, which pushed Game 4 to this afternoon, figured to be a boon for the Nationals. They could skip starter Tanner Roark and pitch Strasburg on full (four days) rest in today’s must-win game, then go with Gio Gonzalez in Game 5. Instead, they’re sticking with Roark because Strasburg is “under the weather,” according to Washington manager Dusty Baker. In a somewhat bizarre press conference after yesterday’s game was called, Baker said much of his team was not feeling well, blaming the change in weather, the air conditioning in the team hotel and at the ballpark, and Chicago “mold.” He also said Strasburg threw a bullpen session earlier in the day, but a team spokesperson later clarified the session occurred on Monday. The bottom line is that Roark, and not Strasburg—a Cy Young candidate who pitched seven innings in Game 1, striking out 10 while not allowing an earned run—will get the ball with Washington’s season on the line. Should the Nationals lose, their fans will be right to question the point of spending $175 million for an asset not deployed in a situation like this. 2. Game 5 in Cleveland Through four games, the ALDS between the Indians and Yankees has pretty much had it all at various times: dominant pitching, offensive outbursts, massive comebacks, critical home runs hit and robbed, extra innings, questionable managerial decisions, and blown calls. The final chapter will be written tonight in Cleveland. That’s where it all began for the pitcher who will take the ball for the Yankees. CC Sabathia finished second in the 2011 Rookie of the Year voting for Cleveland and won the Cy Young in 2007, the year before he was dealt to Milwaukee in advance of becoming a free agent and landing in New York. Though it was easy to forget by the 13th inning, Sabathia also started Game 2 of this series at Progressive Field. As he did that night, he’ll oppose Corey Kluber, who had an uncharacteristically bad outing, failing to get out of the third inning. After last year’s World Series, for the Indians to lose in the first round when holding a 2-0 series lead would be devastating. 3. Astros advance Whichever team survives tonight’s showdown will face the Astros, a team that won 101 games and scored the most runs in baseball during the regular season and kept hitting through a 3-1 series win over Boston. If Chris Sale figured to be some sort of an equalizer for the Red Sox, that thought was extinguished in the first inning of Game 1, when the Astros took him deep twice. For the series, the Astros hit .333 as a team. Justin Verlander earned two victories; he’s won all seven games (six starts) he’s appeared in since coming to Houston. 4. Dodgers dominate On the National League side, the Dodgers swept divisional foe Arizona to advance. Clayton Kershaw’s postseason results have been well documented—he is now 4-7 with a 4.55 ERA—but the four home runs he allowed in Game 1 didn’t prevent the Dodgers from getting the win. The Los Angeles offense is a well-oiled machine right now. The Dodgers tallied a combined 17 runs and 24 hits in the first two games against Arizona. They’re not relying on one or two players; they’re not waiting for a three-run homer. In Game 2, 11 of their 12 hits were singles. Justin Turner—who had five RBI in Game 1—is establishing himself as one of the best postseason hitters in the game. 5. Pitching in These playoffs have been about the bullpens. So far, relievers have thrown more innings than starters. Not a single starter has thrown a pitch in the eighth inning—at least not the starter who began the game; they have contributed out of the bullpen. Robbie Ray appeared in relief in the wild card game and started Game 2 against the Dodgers. Sale and Verlander, the Game 1 starters in Houston, each came out of the pen in Game 4 in Boston. It was Verlander’s first relief appearance ever; he said he had no problem getting warm but didn’t like the mound he inherited. Feeling it wasn’t his place to delay the game as a reliever, he allowed a home run to the first batter he faced. Boston’s Rick Porcello started that game after pitching the final inning of Game 1. Plus, typical starters Josh Tomlin, Jaime Garcia, and David Price all appeared out of the bullpen this postseason (though they didn’t start). Andrew Kahn is a regular contributor to CBS Local. He writes about baseball and other sports at andrewjkahn.com and you can find his Scoop and Score podcast on iTunes. Email him at andrewjkahn@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @AndrewKahn